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CONTINUING EDUCATION - ONLINE COMMUNITY BUILDING SKILLS TRAINING

 

      
     COURSE TITLE:  Online Community Building Skills Training

     PRESENTING ORGANIZATION:  Wisconsin Community Services, Inc. (WCS)

     
     2021 DATES:
February 19-21 and April 23-25

    Register HERE for February Training

 Course Schedule (February)

     Register Here for April Training

 Course Schedule (April)

     
     CONTINUING EDUCATION (CE) HOURS:  
Continuing Education Credit is pending         
     through Commonwealth Educational Seminars for the following professions: Psychologists,
     Licensed Professional Counselors/Licensed Mental Health Counselors, and Social Workers

     CE CREDIT PENDING THROUGH:  Commonwealth Educational Seminars (CES)

     FEE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION PARTICIPANTS:  Pending

     PROGRAM REGISTRATION & GRIEVANCE POLICIES (Fees, cancellation policies, etc.) 
     
     2021 WORKSHOP FLYER

 


     FOR MORE INFORMATION, contact James Bartos, Dashal Young or Ken Ryback.

     CONTACT INFORMATION:  James Bartos
                                                   Community Building Milwaukee Senior Facilitator and Trainer
                                                   (414) 290-0472
                                                   EMAIL

                                                   Dashal Young
                                                   Community Building Milwaukee Project Manager
                                                   (414) 559-4920
                                                   EMAIL

                                                   Ken Ryback
                                                   Community Building Project Specialist
                                                   (414) 234-6246
                                                   EMAIL


COURSE DESCRIPTION

The Community Building Skills Training (CBST) is a Beginning Level course designed and intended for members of the helping professions, including mental health professionals, psychologists, social workers, licensed professional counselors, teachers, youth development professionals, police officers, correction officers, pastors, etc.  The CBST covers clinical intervention but not assessment topics.  Through didactic and experiential methods, the CBST teaches evidence-based or evidence-informed group psychotherapy models, trauma counseling techniques, motivational enhancement skills, and vicarious trauma prevention strategies.  The CBST model is designed to enhance personal development and can potentially strengthen one’s clinical practice in myriad ways.  Identified below are four areas of research, pertaining to psychotherapeutic practice, which the CBST model addresses.

Evidence-based group psychotherapy models acknowledge four stages of group development, which are experienced and taught in the CBST.  These include forming (psuedo-community), storming (chaos), norming (emptying) and performing (community).  See Leszcz, M., & Kobos, J. C. (2008). Evidence‐based group psychotherapy: using AGPA's practice guidelines to enhance clinical effectiveness. Journal of clinical psychology, 64(11), 1238-1260.

The CBST model also promotes listening for kernels of meaning in group members' disclosures.  This is a common practice when receiving trauma narratives as a trauma-focused interventionist (Cohen, Judith A., Esther Deblinger, and Anthony P. Mannarino. "Trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy for children and families." Psychotherapy Research 28, no. 1 (2018): 47-57) and when facilitating post-traumatic growth (Vis, J. A., & Marie Boynton, H. (2008). Spirituality and transcendent meaning making: Possibilities for enhancing posttraumatic growth. Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought, 27(1-2), 69-86.).

In addition, the skills training provides didactic and experiential opportunities to learn the value of non-directive listening skills, which are central to many evidence-based models of psychotherapy, including motivational interviewing (Passmore, J. (2011). Motivational interviewing techniques reflective listening. The Coaching Psychologist, 7(1), 50-53.).

Finally, the CBST facilitates self-awareness and self-care as a foundation of vicarious trauma prevention among mental health professionals (see Harrison, R. L., & Westwood, M. J. (2009). Preventing vicarious traumatization of mental health therapists: Identifying protective practices. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 46(2), 203.).

During CBST, mental health professionals and members of other helping professions also deepen self-acceptance and acceptance of others with the help of seasoned Community Building skills trainers/facilitators. Acceptance forms the basis of effective communication within the Community Building process, and also informs critical factors in the professional helping process. As such, self-acceptance along with effective communication skills learned in the Community Building process generalize beyond the skills training, enriching professional efficacy and satisfaction for mental health professionals and other helping professionals.

There is no known commercial support nor conflict of interest for this Community Building Skills Training.


TARGET AUDIENCE

The target audience are members of the following professions: Psychologists, Licensed Professional Counselors/Licensed Mental Health Counselors and Social Workers. 


COURSE OBJECTIVES

  1. Mental health professionals and members of other helping professions are able to describe the Community Building theory of group development and its distinct principles, practices and four stages.

  2. Workshop participants from the mental health field and other helping professions enlist the communication and self-acceptance practices needed to proceed through Community Building group development stages.

  3. Mental health professionals and members of other helping professions will experience the characteristic dynamics of the four stages of Community Building, be able to recognize them, and how to move between stages in other groups that they work with or are a part of.

  4. Community Building Skills Training participants from the mental health field and other helping  professions will gain experiential insight into how Community Building principles and practices promote group development.

  5. Mental health professionals and members of other helping professions will be able to apply listening skills when receiving trauma narratives and when facilitating post-traumatic growth.

  6. Community Building Skills Training participants from the mental health field and other helping professions bill be able apply non-directive listening skills to motivational interviewing during psychotherapy sessions.

  7. Mental health professionals and members of other helping professions recognize how to apply Community Building principles and practices to individual and group interactions outside the workshop experience, e.g., groups in the community.

  8. Workshop participants from the mental health field and other helping professions recognize non-directive facilitation method practiced by workshop facilitators, and can explain how this method of facilitation contributes to the safety of group members and their investment in the group process.

  9. Mental health professionals and members of other helping professions can explain applications of Community Building to relationships and social groups in a large variety of contexts.

  10. Community Building Skills Training participants from the mental health field and other helping professions will be able to explain how Community Building principles and practices relate to and promote effective communication, building social capital, and increasing EQi components: 1) Intrapersonal (Self-Regard, Emotional Self-Awareness, Assertiveness, Independence, and Self-Actualization); 2) Interpersonal (Empathy, Social Responsibility, and Interpersonal Relationship); and 3) Stress Management (Stress Tolerance and Impulse Control) as a foundation of vicarious trauma prevention among mental health professionals.

COURSE PRESENTERS
CLICK HERE to learn about our presenters.


ACCOMMODATIONS FOR THE DIFFERENTLY ABLED 
Training facilities are handicap accessible. Individuals needing special accommodations, please CONTACT US.


PARTICIPANT APPLYING FOR CE HOURS RESPONSIBILITY  
It is the participant's responsibility to check with their individual state boards to verify CE requirements for their state.


PROFESSIONAL STATEMENTS 
Continuing Education Credit is pending through Commonwealth Educational Seminars for the following professions:

  • Psychologists:  Commonwealth Educational Seminars is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Commonwealth Educational Seminars maintains responsibility for these programs and their content. 
  • Licensed Professional Counselors/Licensed Mental Health Counselors: Commonwealth Educational Seminars (CES) is entitled to award continuing education credit for Licensed Professional Counselors/Licensed Mental Health Counselors. Please visit CES CE CREDIT to see all states that are covered for LPCs/LMHCs. CES maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • Social WorkersCommonwealth Educational Seminars (CES) is entitled to award continuing education credit for Social Workers. Please visit CES CE CREDIT to see all states that are covered for Social Workers. CES maintains responsibility for this program and its content.  If applicable: Social Workers – New York State

Commonwealth Educational Seminars is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers. #SW-0444.

There is no known commercial support nor conflict of interest for this Community Building Skills Training.